Wednesday, March 21, 2018

Slice of Life 2018 Day 21: Rest

Rest
I yearn for easy days - extra sleep, taking time to read, breathe.
Reprieve from busy day chaos (sans rush). Time to simply be.
Looming headache, body aches, stuffy nose...provides forced lengthy rest.

These all give me relief so I can rest better















Above is my first attempt at a sijo poem. Sijo is a Korean poetic form, reported to be even older than Haiku. A sijo poem is three lines long and each line ranges from 14-16 syllables long. In all, a sijo poem ranges from 44-46 syllables.

Below is the basic structure of a sijo poem:
  1. Line one is the introduction to the idea or theme of the poem.
  2. Line two develops the idea or theme or topic more into depth. It can also be a line where there is a "turn." 
  3. Line three is how the poem concludes, but there is usually some sort of a twist or even a joke. This can be irony or humor, a play on words, or a pun. 
According to Writer's Digest, I learned that Sijos are meant to be songs. They can also be funny or personal or something about the mind. Each line is supposed to have some sort of a break or pause in the middle of the line. Finally, the last line needs some sort of a twist in meaning. Some sijo poems are six lines long. According to the Poetry Foundation, a six line sijo is more common for modern sijo poems. This is especially true for those written in English. 

I first heard of sijo poems when I read Linda Sue Park's Tap Dancing on the Roof (Clarion Books, 2007). However, it wasn't until today that I tried one out. I found writing a sijo to be more challenging than it looked, but these kind of writing challenges entice me. (And yes, if you are wondering, dear reader, I really have been sick. My daughter was sick last week, gifted her cold to me, and I spent most of last weekend in bed. I am ready to feel healthy again.) 

Perhaps you will try your pen at writing a sijo and share it with me! 

15 comments:

  1. I just learned what a sijo poem is this week! I love the research and explanation you incorporate. Hope you feel better soon!

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  2. I hope you feel better soon. It's a bummer to be sick for an extended period of time like that. I thought your sijo was really strong--and I appreciated your description of the form. I might try this!

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    1. Thank you! We also had Parent Teacher Conferences this week, so that didn't help! I have been wanting to try to sijo for a while, so it was a good opportunity to try it!

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  3. Despite being sick, you are very productive. I love the sijo form and appreciate the history and explanation, but as w/ other poetry, I'm reluctant to write and share my own poetry, which is also sparse. I like your sijo and expected to see a famous poet's name at the end. I suspect you have notebooks filled w/ your own poetry. Get well and tell those kids to keep their germs to themselves!

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    1. Thank you. I do have notebooks scattered with my poetry, especially haiku! I would love to see your poetry, too. Based on your lovely writing voice, I expect that it would be amazing!

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  4. Sending you healing thoughts! This poem structure is new to me. Thank you for explaining it so clearly. I am going to try it myself! Thank you!

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    1. Thank you! I am feeling better already, but will need a few nights of extra sleep this week!

      Please share what you come up with if you try to sijo!

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  5. I've read Tap Dancing on the Roof, but never tried this form myself. I'm amazed that you were able to work this out during your enforced rest with a cold. I want to try the Lipton Lemon tea. I like herbal, caffeine free teas too. My favorite is the Cinnamon Apple Spice by Celestial Seasonings.

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  6. That's new to me! Added that to my "to try" list and put on my Padlet of writing ideas. Thank you for this, and I hope you are feeling better! The link to the Padlet is https://padlet.com/wymanc/fhn5xjs2w5w8

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    1. Thanks for linking! What a great idea to start a Padlet of writing ideas!

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  7. Trina,

    Thanks for teaching something new to me today.

    Sojo. I shall write one before the year ends. Streching myself thanks to you.

    Best wishes.

    Purviben
    @TrivediZiemba
    http://trivediziemba.edublogs.org/

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    1. Thank you! I would love to see what you come up with for a sijo poem! I found it to be a great way to stretch myself as a writer!

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  8. I have never written a sijo, but think I might like to try one. I hope you are feeling better and getting lots of sleep!

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  9. Trina, Christie Wyman shared your sijo poem as a possible format for 2019 Sol 19. As a person who enjoys trying out new formats, I would like to try this poetic form. I like what you did with your sijo and hope to find the right words to create one this March.

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